A Pre-Project Checklist for Large-Scale Desktop Deployments

With software asset managementvolume licence management and many more tasks involved in any large-scale desktop deployment, relying on a few highly meticulous staff members isn’t enough. This undergoing will require a robust pre-project checklist delineating the most important tasks to ensure a smooth desktop deployment.

To better prepare, consider these 4 essential to-dos. While it’s by no means a comprehensive list, it should get you thinking about all of the major areas you need to cover during a desktop deployment project, and whether you have the staff and expertise in-house to complete it or you need to look to an experienced IT firm to help.

1. Conduct a comprehensive hardware and application discovery and analysis.

In order to determine the extent and depth of your desktop deployment, you must have a thorough understanding of your environment. This phase should begin with an understanding of the machines that need to be replaced and those that will remain. This will determine the hardware platforms the desktop operating system will need to support. Next you’ll need to focus on applications to provide a useful inventory and to reveal how multiple versions of software applications are used throughout your organisation. In many instances, different divisions use multiple versions of the same software, for no logical reason. With your entire organisation’s hardware and software taken into account with asset management, you can begin to decommission older versions, create consistency and save money before your desktop deployment.

2. Tally your peripherals.

Some divisions have multiple peripherals for specific business processes. For example, the warehouse may have one set of scanners to track incoming and outgoing units. But a fulfilment department may use an entirely different set of scanners to log packages that are ready to ship. While your research may reveal one peripheral that can address each business process, you’ll want to include these in your software asset management strategy.

3. Assess your infrastructure—or infrastructures – as well as your deployment mechanisms.

Can your current global infrastructure accommodate your desktop deployment? What about the network and servers in your regional offices? And how will your deployment affect security—globally, locally and regionally? How will a telecommuter receive the updates they need without forcing themselves to become IT experts? Do you have the correct deployment mechanisms to handle the size of your rollout?

If your resources are already depleted assessing your devices, software and peripherals, IT consultants may be the best option for a comprehensive assessment and deployment.

4. Ensure you have the space to accommodate a large-scale desktop deployment.

Logistics are often forgotten about during the desktop deployment planning period. During rollouts, physical storage space is required to store new computers prior to rollout and old computers that need to be decommissioned or repurposed. Do you have adequate space to store packaging and hardware? Packaging for PCs, monitors and other peripherals can take up significant space.

Following this pre-project checklist will certainly add time to your deployment timeframe, but far less than fixing myriad hardware and software issues after launch. The investment in preparation always pays dividends in a successful desktop deployment.

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About Rohit Bhuteja

Rohit Bhuteja is the General Manager of Professional Services for Datacom, Victoria, Australia. With 19 years of technology experience, Rohit leads a team of solution architects focused on designing agile IT environments that result in more productivity and overall cost savings for Datacom clients. His team’s goal is to help internal IT departments focus on strategy, including creating overall technology roadmaps, designing efficient end-user computer and infrastructure environments, and implementing a variety of vendor solutions, including Microsoft desktop software.

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